World Views of the Western World, Year 3

World Views of the Western World Year III explores the 20th century’s shift away from Christianity in its think-ing, the effects of that shift, and Christianity’s answers. There are six main units in this study. Unit 1 studies main categories of world view while reading and examining corresponding literature. Unit 2 does an in-depth study of evolution versus creation arguments. Unit 3 examines philosophical thought through history. Unit 4 views the causes of the Civil War and its consequences on our Constitution. Unit 5 is a study of the history of economic thought alongside the Biblical view of economics. Unit 6 examines what we as Christians have to give as answers to the 21st century culture and how we are to live.

World Views of the Western World employs a unified study exploring the foundation and formation of Western civilization while integrating multiple streams of academic discipline—world history, literature, philosophy, theology, humanities, American Government, economics, science, art and music while following changes in philosophies through time along with their implications and consequences to society. Classics are a primary focus and are studied with an eye to understanding the world view that influenced their creation.

Equip your children to meet the questions the culture is asking them about why they believe the Bible and why it is relevant today. Teach them to stand by the solid and unchanging truths of the Bible. Give them a Biblical world view—an understanding of what the Bible says, why they believe it, and how to defend it. Educate them on opposing world views and their origins. Prepare your child to recognize truth.

Description

World Views of the Western World Year III, Christianity Answers the 21st Century, by David Quine

  • 10 units History, 10 units English Literature and Composition, 10 units Philosophy, 5 units Economics
  • Areas of Study: World Views of the Western World III integrates history, Economics, literature, composition, art, Bible, and philosophy.
  • Teacher/Mentor: Susan Watanabe
  • Course Length: Two semesters
  • Course Fee: $85/month
  • Credit: Credit for at least three full year classes, including ten units for high school Literature and Composition, ten units for Philosophy/Theology, ten units for History, five units for Economics
  • Type of Class: Group class emphasizing discussion
  • Questions: Email Susan Watanabe 
  • Recommendations: Students are not required to take all of the courses in the series and can begin with year three.
  • Shelter in Place: Same Fees apply

Course Description:

World Views of the Western World Year III explores the 20th century’s shift away from Christianity in its think-ing, the effects of that shift, and Christianity’s answers. There are six main units in this study. Unit 1 studies main categories of world view while reading and examining corresponding literature. Unit 2 does an in-depth study of evolution versus creation arguments. Unit 3 examines philosophical thought through history. Unit 4 views the causes of the Civil War and its consequences on our Constitution. Unit 5 is a study of the history of economic thought alongside the Biblical view of economics. Unit 6 examines what we as Christians have to give as answers to the 21st century culture and how we are to live.

World Views of the Western World employs a unified study exploring the foundation and formation of Western civilization while integrating multiple streams of academic discipline—world history, literature, philosophy, theology, humanities, American Government, economics, science, art and music while following changes in philosophies through time along with their implications and consequences to society. Classics are a primary focus and are studied with an eye to understanding the world view that influenced their creation.

Equip your children to meet the questions the culture is asking them about why they believe the Bible and why it is relevant today. Teach them to stand by the solid and unchanging truths of the Bible. Give them a Biblical world view—an understanding of what the Bible says, why they believe it, and how to defend it. Educate them on opposing world views and their origins. Prepare your child to recognize truth.

This series of four high school classes integrates Bible literacy with the study of Western civilization, literature, art, music, government, economics, and philosophy into a single course.

5. Starting Points – Introduction to a Biblical world view and evaluation

6. Year I, The Bible and Ancient Thought

7. Year II, The Grandeur of Christianity and The Revolutionary Age

8. Year III, Christianity Answers the 21st Century

In addition to infusing knowledge in core academic disciplines, these courses exercise and develop the student’s reading, evaluation, discussion, and writing skills.

The unique strengths of this course:

  • All disciplines are studied together.
  • Each subject and each year interrelates and builds.
  • All ideas are examined against the Biblical world view.
  • The Bible is seen as a coherent, unified system, a framework against which information can be organized and analyzed.
  • The course content requires the student to reflect thoughtfully on the material.
  • Students read, learn, and evaluate on their own before further analysis and discussion in class.
  • Students are prepared to give Christian answers in all fields of study.
  • Multiple years of checking ideas against the truths of the Bible form a life habit.

Required Books: See cornerstonecurriculum.com and please contact the instructor before buying materials.

BOOKS

Walden Two

Old Man and the Sea

AUDIOS

Darwin and Evolution

David Hume

VIDEOS

Grasping for the Wind

Rediscovering Christ

 

The Plague

Darwin on Trial

Of Pandas and People

Sophie’s World

Second American Revolution

The New Tolerance

True Spirituality

Pollution and the Death of Man

That Hideous Strength

The New Evidence That

Demands a Verdict

Economics in One Lesson

Immanuel Kant

Friedrich Hegel

Soren Kierkegaard

Friedrich Nietzsche

Jean-Paul Sartre

The Civil War

Whatever Happened to the Human Race?

Assignment Criteria: Work will be divided into weekly assignments. Students will be expected to finish these assignments each week so they are prepared to discuss their findings on Friday. It is important that all of the questions in the workbook are answered as this is what will be the basis for the discussion during class.

There will also be several essays due during the course of the year. This is the primary means used in this course for the student to show what he or she has learned. Writing instruction will be given during class.

Keep in mind that this course is worth the same as at least three full classes. Please be sure you understand that homework may take up to three hours a day four days a week.

Please come to class with a hard copy of your assignments completed and your workbook filled in. Assignments are due at the beginning of class. All work should be done neatly and reflect the student’s best efforts.